Hamburg

Hamburg

Hamburg, with more than 1.8 million inhabitants, is the second largest city in Germany with one of the largest ports in Europe and is especially known for its dynamic area of media, trade and nightlife.

At the same time it is a cultural stronghold for art and music. There are only a few skyscrapers here, but about 2400 bridges crossing the city's rivers and canals - more than in Venice - and many spacious lush parks.

Hamburg's streets offer a charming architectural mix of Art Nouveau villas made of stone and marble, neoclassical manor houses and stately residences along the riverside roads. Of particular note is Hamburg's fine brick expressionism, an architectural movement from the 1920s and 1930s that integrated the characteristic dark red bricks of northern Germany into its facades. The Chilehaus, a striking office building reminiscent of a passenger ship, represents the architectural style as one of Hamburg's most important landmarks.

HafenCity, home to the famous Elbe Philharmonic Hall, is Hamburg's newest of seven districts and is as ambitious as it is beautiful. Extravagant modern architecture meets the old harbour warehouses made of red brick, which are attractively illuminated at night by spectacular light art installations. The centre is Hamburg-Mitte. Here, Hamburg is the busiest and most densely populated city with museums, historic buildings and pedestrian bridges. In Altona, the westernmost part of the city, the factories of the 19th century were converted into hotels, offices and theatres. Its district of "Ottensen an der Elbe" has become a sought-after quarter for the well-heeled. Blankenese is also a prestigious area with grandiose properties, many overlooking the river. Here in the suburbs you will find elegant villas, while the centre offers exclusive penthouses.